It’s time to get those awkward serving platters safely stored so you can enjoy a season’s worth of cocktail and dinner parties without losing your head. Seriously, precariously stacked platters are dangerous. Consider these ideas for keeping your platters secure but handy, so they’re ready when you need them at party time. 

Traditional Kitchen

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Mamaroneck Kitchen & Bath Designers

Dearborn Cabinetry LLC

Stacking too many heavy platters on top of one another in an overhead cabinet is a recipe for disaster. It’s great to have a variety of platters to handle whatever dish you’re serving, but that assortment means your platters probably don’t stack well. 

Keeping platters up high is actually a great space saver; the key is to fashion a deep shelf with partitions so platters can be stashed sideways. Standard upper cabinets are 12 inches deep, whereas base and floor-to-ceiling cabinets measure 24 inches, making the latter the most obvious cabinetry option for large platters.

Going vertical. The team at Dearborn Cabinetry included tray storage over this built-in microwave, making efficient use of the work area’s height. Built-in dividers placed in narrow increments keep upright platters safe, visible and reachable.

Traditional Kitchen

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Chicago Kitchen & Bath Designers

Rebekah Zaveloff | KitchenLab

The top tier of a floor-to-ceiling pantry is ideal for partitioned platter storage. It keeps trays available when needed but out of the way of the pantry’s more frequently used areas. Keep a folding stool nearby to lessen any temptation to climb up shelves.

Eclectic Kitchen

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Berkeley Closet & Home Storage Designers

California Closets

The comprehensive shelving system in this closet-style pantry takes the need for a stool out of the platter-finding equation. This setup includes vertical storage for muffin pans, another one of the tricky-shaped tools so often used around the holidays.

Modern Spaces

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Howard Lake Cabinets & Cabinetry

Dura Supreme Cabinetry

Horizontal stacks. If you still prefer to stack platters, use a deep cabinet or appliance garage and set horizontal shelves in a narrow formation, like in this setup by Dura Supreme. Take advantage of a cabinet’s predrilled borings, if it has them, by adding as many shelves as you need to maximize capacity. You can get additional shelves from the manufacturer or have new ones made to match.

Traditional Kitchen

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Woodbridge Interior Designers & Decorators

miriam manzo

Show it off. Plate racks are an ideal way of putting your favorite dishware on display. If your home is older, you just might be lucky enough to have a built-in plate rack. If not, a carpenter can recess one within a wall (as long as the recess is free of plumbing, electricity or venting) and match the rest of the kitchen’s finishes.

Traditional Kitchen

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Hagerstown General Contractors

david lyles developers

This rack keeps platters near the ovens and island but doesn’t get in the way of the kitchen’s everyday work zones.

Eclectic Kitchen

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Other Metro Media & Bloggers

Jeanette Lunde

These two vintage racks turn an empty wall into effective (and pretty) platter storage.

Mediterranean Kitchen

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Dallas General Contractors

Gage Homes Inc.

A more extensive version such as this tall rack allows ample space for plates and platters by placing them sideways. Because its location doesn’t hinge on a connection to cabinetry, it can be hung at any level that makes the most sense.

Traditional Kitchen

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Greensboro Kitchen & Bath Designers

Cabinet Concepts, Greensboro

Don’t forget base cabinets. If your platters are heavy or you use them often, keep them at hand in deep, partitioned drawers like this one from Cabinet Concepts. No stools needed to find what you’re looking for.

Traditional Kitchen

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Mountain View Appliances

Kitchens by Meyer Inc.

A single, full-size pullout behind cabinet doors provides room for larger platters. Its location directly under a large countertop ensures an ample workstation for filling up a big serving dish.

Asian Kitchen

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Los Angeles Interior Designers & Decorators

Slesinski Design Group, Inc.

Take advantage of shallow spaces. If storage is a difficult thing to find room for, make room in unexpected places, like shallow drawers. In this kitchen the otherwise wasted space below the base cabinets has been utilized for valuable storage.

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