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Last week we looked at some gorgeous green backsplashes. This week we’re swinging over to the other side of the color wheel to focus on rousing reds. Red can be a tricky color to work with, especially in superbright and bold shades. If it’s combined with too many other loud colors or elements, the effect can be overwhelming and at times garish. 

The key is to use just a little bit, because red really will go a long way toward adding vibrancy to your kitchen. That’s why a backsplash is a terrific place to add a dash of red. (Backsplashes typically encompass a relatively small section of a wall or walls, so this element is usually the perfect size for embracing reds.) Check out these 15 fetching examples of how to rock a red backsplash, along with the pertinent information for each in case you see something you like for your own kitchen. 

This beautiful glass mosaic tile adds some nice shimmer to a contemporary light-filled kitchen. Red partners well with warm wood tones, and the white countertop and ceiling add crispness. 

 

Here’s another gorgeous glass mosaic tile, this one in linear bricks instead of squares. The swath of red, which gets picked up by the pendants over the peninsula, adds a nice punch of bold color. Using a blend of colors for the backsplash tile (rather than one single color) makes the backsplash appear less monolithic, and therefore more modern or transitional in style than slick and contemporary.  

I love a kitchen with a garage door! It allows in so much natural light during the day, and gives the kitchen a cool industrial vibe. With so much light filtering in, you can really go big and bold with the backsplash. These tiles are dual glazed — each 2-inch by 4-inch tile is finished in multiple colors with glossy and matte glazes, which gives a slight mosaic look but in a subway-tile format. 

I’m a huge fan of three-dimensional tiles, and these ovals are among my favorites. Admittedly, the nooks and crannies might require a bit more elbow grease to keep clean but, to me anyway, the wow factor they add to the kitchen is worth the extra upkeep. 

For those who prefer a low-maintenance backsplash, look into back-painted glass. This can be a well-priced option for savvy DIYers, or check with your local glass supplier to find someone with the experience and know-how to help you create your own custom back-painted-glass backsplash. Here one works strikingly for a red-hot ubermodern theme. 

Here’s another unique glass backsplash option: Aura glass from Ann Sacks. This material is available in a range of sizes, from 4- by 8-inch bricks to various-size hexagons and sheets up to 24 by 40 inches.  

Get the look of a solid glass backsplash but with all the shimmering texture of a glass mosaic by selecting a small-format glass mosaic in a single hue. This gorgeous backsplash sparkles and adds a touch of glam to this elegant kitchen. 

Here’s another version of the Gloss Mosaic tiles from Artistic Tile. I like how the kitchen palette was kept very light, cool and neutral, which allows the hot, shimmery backsplash to take center stage. 

I recommend playing with scale, because there are now so many options available in backsplash tile beyond the once-standard 3- by 6-inch subways or 4-inch squares. These skinny sticks look clean, neat and modern. 

Or go big with a superwide-format subway tile. These 3- by 16-inch glass tiles look sharp in this cool kitchen.

 

Who says backsplash tile has to be rectangular? This tile has a softer, more organic geometric shape, which adds oodles of charm and a vintage feel. 

This is another favorite backsplash tile of mine. I love the irregular and random triangular and wedge shapes as well as the subtle color variation among the pieces. This particular tile requires fairly thick grout lines, so be sure to seal the grout according to the manufacturer’s specifications. 

This gorgeous iridescent glass mosaic tile would work with a variety of design styles, from traditional to contemporary. And it has a good amount of orangish-red coloration, so it harmonizes well with the orange tones expressed by the wood flooring and cabinets. 

These cool glass stick mosaic tiles are reminiscent of stained glass panels, but with a modern twist. You can run this tile vertically or horizontally. Installing it vertically, as shown here, draws your eye up the wall and makes the ceiling feel higher.  

Here’s another nice linear stick glass mosaic tile with beautiful coloration. The white grout helps showcase the individual tiles and ties in well with the crisp, white countertop.

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